Thursday, 6 August 2020

Horror Review: Intruder (1989)


The overnight stock crew of a local supermarket find themselves being stalked and slashed by a mysterious maniac.

Okay so I'll be honest with you, the only reason I actually picked up this film was because it had Bruce Campbell's name on the cover.


But that was many years ago and since then this film has become a firm favourite of mine, it's become one of my 'go-to' Horror films when I can't decide what to watch. The fact that I haven't talked about this feature before is really surprising so now is the time to rectify that.

What we have here is a perfect example of a stalk and slash style Horror film, the fact that it involves the team that brought us "Evil Dead 1& 2" is even better. We even see Sam Raimi in a rare on screen appearance which is fun for fans, we also see his brother Ted who I think we can all agree is always fun to watch.


Whilst admittedly it does have a hit and miss casting, it's strong point is the amazing directorial work by Scott Spiegel. The camera work is great and we see some really well shot scenes that make you wonder whether Sam Raimi helped out as it is reminiscent of his style, either way it works.

The film features some really fun and imaginative death scenes that  you expect from these style of films and they will certainly satisfy gore hungry viewers. The effects in the death scenes need to be mentioned as well as they are fantastic and it shows how great practical effects are when done properly. 


"Intruder" is a fun 80's flick that that has a great mixture of Horror and dark humour, fans of Slasher films will certainly enjoy this and if you haven't seen it then I urge you to do so.


If you want to see the "Intruder" trailer then just click on the video below:



Miscellaneous facts about the film:

Bruce Campbell, Sam Raimi, and Ted Raimi were all heavily promoted by Paramount as the stars of the film, and their names feature prominently on video and DVD artwork. None of them are actually the stars of the picture.

The film was shot in an actual grocery store in Bell, California during the evenings when the store was closed.

Despite receiving top billing on the DVD releases of this film, cult hero Bruce Campbell only makes a brief appearance in the film as a policeman at the end.

The film was originally entitled "The Night Crew", but distributors felt that the film would be more marketable if it was given a more generic slasher movie title. It was released as "Intruder".

The song that Randy (Sam Raimi) sings was also featured in The Evil Dead (1981), directed by Raimi.

The entire movie was shot using short ends.

Emil Sitka's character says the line, "hold hands you lovebirds." Emil Sitka was known for saying this line in The Three Stooges shorts, which Sam Raimi is a big fan of. It is also written on Emil Sitka's Tombstone.

The "head in one hand, sandwich in the other" speech was previously used in Raising Arizona (1987).

Director Scott Spiegel cameos as the ill-fated bread man.

At one point in pre-production, Tobe Hooper was originally set to direct.

The Paramount VHS video cover (along with various other video and DVD releases) and the film's trailers all reveal the identity of the killer, thus spoiling the film's dramatic tension.

The films Italian title is "Terrore senza volto" which translates to "Terror Without A Face" in English.

The town where this film is set; Walnut Lake, Michigan, is named after a lake in West Bloomfield, MI called Walnut Lake. Director Scott Spiegel, the Raimi brothers, and Bruce Campbell grew up in the West Bloomfield/Bloomfield Hills area.

The film was partially based around Scott Spiegel's experiences working at the real Walnut Lake Market in Michigan. It was also something of a remake of an earlier Super-8 short film by Spiegel. The short was a slasher story called 'Night Crew' and featured a more Halloween (1978) inspired killer.

The main musical theme of movie was previously used in Transformations (1988).

The TV Guide which is prominently seen at the checkout lane is the March 12, 1988 edition.

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